HEADACHE – AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PROBLEM-ASPECTS OF DENTAL FUNCTIONAL DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY

Aim: Craniofacial pain is one of the most common disorders affecting the general population. The aim of this article is to show the importance of interdisciplinary approach in solving complicated cases with headache and atypical facial pain.
Summary: Two case reports are presented, with severe craniofacial pain, with underlying intricate causes. The case of a 23 aged female with tension headaches, bilateral tinnitus and atypical facial pain, but also with anterior open bite from premolars who was admitted to a neurological clinic, was finally resolved only after a splint therapy. The other case was a 42 year old woman with severe unilateral facial pain, caused by an endometric tissue from maxillary bone that produced multiple hollows or cavities in the adjacent teeth. The pain was alleviated after teeth extractions and appropriate hormonal therapy.
Key learning points: Because headache causes are manifold, diagnostics and therapy require an interdisciplinary medical approach.
From the dental and maxillofacial standpoint, diseases and disorders of the teeth, periodontium, other craniofacial hard and soft tissues, as well as craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD) must be taken into consideration in treating such patients.
Keywords: unspecific headache, tension headache, muscle relaxation, craniomandibular
dysfunction, Michigan splint

Authors: Georg B. Meyer, Olaf Bernhardt, Arnd Küppers
DOI: https://doi.org/10.25241/stomaeduj.2014.1(1).art.6

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